Leadership Styles: 5 of the most common

Leadership Styles vary and there are benefits and issues with many, post pandemic some of them will faire better than the others, but which style are you?

The 5 main Leadership Styles

There are traditionally 5 main leadership styles within the workplace Authoritarian, Participative, Delegative, Transactional, Transactional & Transformation, and it is extremely helpful within the team you manage to understand which one of them you are. It also gives you an understanding of areas you could look to change within your team.

1: Authoritarian Leadership Style

The authoritarian leadership style enables a leader to lay down expectations and establish outcomes. When a leader is the most informed member of the team, it might work. Despite this being an efficient technique in time-constrained situations, originality may be lost as input from the team is limited. The authoritarian leadership approach is also employed when members on the team are new or inexperienced and need clear guidance to complete the task at hand. In these cases, the leader functions more as a coach, providing specific instructions and monitoring performance closely. This leadership style can also lead to tension and conflict within the team, as team members may feel micromanaged or unengaged in the work process.

When a leader uses a dictatorial leadership style, he or she is typically the one who makes all of the decisions for her team. This can be advantageous because it reduces the amount of time spent making decisions and can help to prevent mistakes from happening. Additionally, this leadership style can result in more consistent outcomes. However, there are also some disadvantages to using a dictatorial leadership style. For example, it can stifle employee creativity and innovation and reduce group cohesion. Additionally, in some cultures, dictatorship may have negative connotations.

2. Participative Leadership Style

Participative leadership styles are based on democratic principles. The goal is for team members to have a say in decisions. Team members will feel included, engaged, and motivated to give their input because of it. In most situations, the leader has the final word when it comes to making decisions. However, reaching a consensus may be time-consuming if there are a lot of team members. Additionally, some team members may feel that their voices are not being heard if the leader does not consider their input.

It facilitates communication and cooperation. It encourages workers to use their imaginations. A participative leadership approach aids in the formation of a strong team. High levels of efficiency are possible. The disadvantages to it however are a lot of time is consumed by decision-making processes. Decision-making processes can become time-consuming. Leaders are more likely to take credit for successes and deflect blame for failures. Workers may feel that their voices are not being heard.

3. Delegative Leadership Style

Delegative leadership, also known as “laissez-faire leadership,” is a delegative leadership style that focuses on allowing team members to take the lead. If team members are capable, accept responsibility, and enjoy working independently, this may be a successful approach. However, conflicts among the members might fracture and break a group’s bonds of trust. There is also the potential for a leader to appear uninvolved or unconcerned about what is happening within the group.

The advantages of delegative leadership are that it can lead to increased creativity and innovation, as team members are given the freedom to explore new ideas. Additionally, delegative leadership can help to build trust within the team, as team members feel empowered to take ownership of their work. Finally, delegative leadership can save the leader time, as she does not need to be involved in every decision.

The disadvantages of delegative leadership are that it can lead to a lack of direction, as team members may not be sure what the leader wants or expects. Additionally, delegative leadership can result in a power struggle among team members, as each person vies for control. Finally, delegative leadership can be difficult to implement in fast -paced or high-pressure environments, as there may not be time for team members to make decisions.

4. Transactional Leadership Style

Transactional leadership is a type of leadership that focuses on the exchange between the leader and the followers. The leader provides guidance and direction, and in return, the followers comply with the leader’s requests. This type of leadership can be effective in environments where there is a clear hierarchy and where employees are motivated by tangible rewards. However, transactional leadership can also lead to a lack of creativity and innovation, as team members may feel that they are not able to think outside of the box. Additionally, transactional leadership can foster a sense of dependency among followers, as they may become reliant on the leader for direction.

The advantages of transactional leadership are that it can provide structure and order, as team members know what is expected of them. Additionally, transactional leadership can be motivating, as followers are rewarded for meeting the leader’s expectations. Finally, transactional leadership can be effective in emergency situations, as the leader is able to take charge and provide clear direction.

The disadvantages of transactional leadership are that it can stifle creativity and innovation, as team members may feel that they are not able to think outside of the box. Additionally, transactional leadership can foster a sense of dependency among followers, as they may become reliant on the leader for direction. Finally, transactional leadership can be inflexible, as the leader is focused on following the rules and regulations.

5. Transformational Leadership

Transformational leadership is a type of leadership that focuses on the development of followers. The leader provides guidance and direction but also encourages the followers to be creative and innovative. This type of leadership can be effective in environments where there is a need for change and where employees are motivated by intangible rewards. However, transformational leadership can also lead to a lack of structure and order, as team members may feel that they are not able to think outside of the box. Additionally, transformational leadership can foster a sense of dependency among followers, as they may become reliant on the leader for direction.

The advantages of transformational leadership are that it can encourage creativity and innovation, as team members are encouraged to think outside of the box. Additionally, transformational leadership can be motivating, as followers are inspired by the leader’s vision. Finally, transformational leadership can be flexible, as the leader is open to new ideas and ways of doing things

The disadvantages of transformational leadership are that it can foster a sense of dependency among followers, as they may become reliant on the leader for direction. Additionally, transformational leadership can be time-consuming, as the leader must invest time in developing relationships with followers. Finally, transformational leadership can be demanding, as the leader must be available to followers at all times.

Which leadership style is the most effective?

The answer to this question depends on the situation and the goals of the leader. Each leadership style has its advantages and disadvantages, so the best leadership style depends on the specific situation. If the goal is to provide structure and order, then transactional leadership may be the most effective. If the goal is to encourage creativity and innovation, then transformational leadership may be the most effective. The most important thing is to choose the type of leadership that will best fit the needs of the team and the organization.

In conclusion, leadership style is not one size fits all. The best type of leadership depends on the specific situation and the goals of the leader. The most important thing is to choose the type of leadership that will best fit the needs of the team and the organisation, this is what I class as Dynamics Leadership

What do you think? Do you agree or disagree with the above statement? Let us know in the comments below!

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